Alcohol-Risk and HIV

Alcohol-Risk and HIV

Alcoholic Beverage Companies and the HIV Response in Sub-Saharan Africa

Alcoholic Beverage Companies and the HIV Response in Sub-Saharan Africa

This case study presents the responses developed by the alcoholic beverage companies Heineken and SABMiller to address HIV within their African business communities.

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  • AIDSFree

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2016

Addressing the Impact of Alcohol on the Prevention, Care, and Treatment of HIV in Southern and Eastern Africa: Research, Programming, and Next Steps

Cover of Addressing the Impact of Alcohol on the Prevention, Care, and Treatment of HIV in Southern and Eastern Africa: Research, Programming, and Next Steps

Alcohol use in virtually all cultures reduces both the perception of risk and inhibitions about engaging in risky behavior. Research conducted throughout the world has documented the association between alcohol use and high-risk behaviors, including inconsistent condom use with casual partners, a greater number of lifetime and recent sexual partners, concurrency of sexual partners, intergenerational sex, the buying and selling of sex, and the experience of violent or coercive sex—and all of these, in turn, are associated with an increased risk of HIV infection.1 Alcohol consumption continues to increase in sub-Saharan Africa, with South Africa displaying one of the world’s highest volumes per capita of alcohol consumption; also, sub-Saharan Africa is still home to two-thirds of all people living with HIV. Innovative programmatic approaches to respond to hazardous alcohol use and risk of HIV infection are being implemented in several countries and are beginning to yield positive results. However, they remain underfunded and lack political support.

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  • AIDSTAR-One

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2012

Reducing Alcohol-Related HIV Risk in Katutura, Namibia: Results from a Multi-Level Intervention

Cover of Reducing Alcohol-Related HIV Risk in Katutura, Namibia: Results from a Multi-Level Intervention

A strong body of evidence shows that alcohol consumption is associated with the sexual behaviors that put people at risk for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. The AIDSTAR-One project, with funding from the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, conducted a 3-year demonstration project in Namibia—a country with high HIV prevalence and heavy alcohol use. This project had two goals: reducing heavy drinking and reducing risky sexual behavior among bar patrons in a low-income neighborhood on the outskirts of Namibia's capital, Windhoek. This report describes how the intervention was implemented, monitored, and evaluated, and reports the final assessment results. It also offers key recommendations for future research and programming in this important area.

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  • AIDSTAR-One

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2012

Reducing Alcohol-Related HIV Risk in Katutura, Namibia: A Multi-Level Intervention

Cover of Reducing Alcohol-Related HIV Risk in Katutura, Namibia: A Multi-Level Intervention

A growing body of epidemiological and social science research links alcohol consumption with the sexual behaviors that put people at risk for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. The AIDSTAR-One project is receiving funds from the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, through the U.S. Agency for International Development, to conduct a 2.5-year demonstration project in Namibia—a country with high HIV prevalence and heavy alcohol use. This project has two goals: reducing heavy drinking and reducing risky sexual behavior among bar patrons. The project is working in Kabila, a new and rapidly growing settlement in Katutura on the outskirts of Namibia’s capital, Windhoek. This report describes the methods, findings, and programmatic implications of formative research, which was carried out in the first phase of the demonstration project (May to October 2010).

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  • AIDSTAR-One

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2012

Alcohol and Risky Sex: Breaking the Link

Cover of Alcohol and Risky Sex: Breaking the Link

Look beneath the surface of the HIV epidemic in any country around the globe and you will find an array of structural drivers of risk that are rarely discussed. These are the underlying social forces that influence whether individuals choose a healthy behavior instead of an unhealthy one, or whether they have a choice at all. Poverty, gender inequality, stigma, and discrimination are all such structural drivers of risk. But in countries battling the most severe HIV epidemics in the world, there is yet another powerful and under-addressed structural force at play: the ubiquitous availability of cheap alcohol and drinking norms that encourage its hazardous use.

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  • AIDSTAR-One

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2011

Prevention of Alcohol-Related HIV Risk Behavior

Cover of Prevention of Alcohol-Related HIV Risk Behavior

A growing body of epidemiological and social science research, much of it conducted in developing countries experiencing severe HIV epidemics, suggests that alcohol consumption is associated with the sexual behaviors that put people at risk for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) (Cook and Clark 2005; Kalichman et al. 2007b). This scientific evidence provides a compelling call to action. In countries battling severe HIV epidemics, addressing harmful drinking in conjunction with interventions to reduce sexual risk behavior may have the potential to reduce HIV transmission more quickly than conventional HIV prevention interventions alone.

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  • AIDSTAR-One

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2009

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